Main Index
History Index
Modeling Index

Trail Index

Index>Bones
What Remains of the Sussex Branch?

Last Update: 10 July 2003

 
On this page you will find notes of artifacts and evidence pertaining to the Sussex Branch and it's associated industries after its abandonment.


Updated 2 June 2003

Waterloo Station Site

(Note: this property is not part of the Sussex Branch Trail. I do NOT encourage anyone to trespass on this property without permission of the owners. As soon as I find out who that is, I'll let you know.) ;-)>

  • The 50 foot turntable pit is still intact, though filled with trash.
  • Retaining wall along tracks in use.
  • Several Foundations and a hole (presumably the outhouse pit)
  • There is a long berm with a rectangular, stone-lined pit near the turntable. This was the scale track and the pit is where the scale resided to weigh cars.
  • If you look across from the road, you can still make out part of the fill heading toward Waterloo Village. A lot of the top of the fill was scrapped away when Route 80 went in.

 

Waterloo Village:

(Waterloo Village is a seasonal attraction and has an entrance fee. The area where these artifacts are found is not the regular part of the village, so if for some reason you are chased away by someone of authority, just go. Don't give railroad historians more trouble than they need when they ask permission to give tours. Also, don't try getting in from the Rt. 80 side. It's dangerous and ILLEGAL.)

  • On the incline plane, you can make out where the railroad bridge used to cross over.
  • If you follow the decayed macadam you can see where the highway bridge used to be. The stones of the abutments have been removed.
  • You can actually follow the railroad bed the entire length until you come to a bridge that's out. Coming back along this 'trail' the watchful can tell where a siding breaks off, leading down to the ice house.

 

[Ackerson][Andover][Augusta][Between Waterloo Road and Cranberry Lake][Branchville][Branchville Junction][Cranberry Lake][Franklin][Lafayette][Monroe][Netcong][Newton][Stanhope][Strader's][Waterloo]


Updated 8 April 2001

Between Waterloo Road and Cranberry Lake (Byram Township)

  • At the entrance to the Parking area, a length of 50 lb. rail sticks out of the ground--probably a surveyor's maker. This is likely original Sussex Railroad iron.
  • A line of concrete fence posts can be seen on the east side of the Right of Way.
  • Just before the Jefferson Lake siding, the mule road branches off to the west. This can actually be walked (one small stream to cross.) It rejoins the steam road a ways up.
  • Just above Jefferson Lake, there a poor bent over Mile Post (51.) This is the most complete specimen on the Branch. It just needs numbers, a paint job, and to be straightened up.
  • There is a rock cut below Cranberry Lake. Just south of this cut can be seen the ROW of the old mule road where it crossed and went around the cut. (Look for the bridge abutments of the mule road to the west of the ROW and follow it to the rock cut.)

 

[Ackerson][Andover][Augusta][Between Waterloo Road and Cranberry Lake][Branchville][Branchville Junction][Cranberry Lake][Franklin][Lafayette][Monroe][Netcong][Newton][Stanhope][Strader's][Waterloo]


Last Updated 10 July 2003

Netcong

  • Old Telegraph poles still line the ghost of the Right of Way at the end of the Parking lot.

 

[Ackerson][Andover][Augusta][Between Waterloo Road and Cranberry Lake][Branchville][Branchville Junction][Cranberry Lake][Franklin][Lafayette][Monroe][Netcong][Newton][Stanhope][Strader's][Waterloo]


Updated: 21 March 2001

Stanhope

  • Where Love Lane meets Waterloo Rd., one of the old abutments is still in from the trestle that crossed here.

 

[Ackerson][Andover][Augusta][Between Waterloo Road and Cranberry Lake][Branchville][Branchville Junction][Cranberry Lake][Franklin][Lafayette][Monroe][Netcong][Newton][Stanhope][Strader's][Waterloo]


Updated 17 March 2000

Cranberry Lake

  • Aside from cinder paths leading to and from the commuter parking lot, I've never seen any evidence of the railroad here. I have heard, though that remains of the 1902 resort bridge can be seen under the surface of the lake.

 

[Ackerson][Andover][Augusta][Between Waterloo Road and Cranberry Lake][Branchville][Branchville Junction][Cranberry Lake][Franklin][Lafayette][Monroe][Netcong][Newton][Stanhope][Strader's][Waterloo]


Updated 17 July 2000

Andover

  • The hole in the wall is probably one of the best known landmarks of the branch. It's still in and now sports guard rails for the hikers, courtesy of the State Parks Commission.
  • South of the Cut-off tunnel, there is a cattle pass.
  • The Cut-off Tunnel, locally known as the realm of the Hookerman, was evidently constructed wide enough for double track on the branch, however the frugal Lackawanna did not blast out the rock on the unused side when the Cut-Off tunnel was built over the pre-existing Sussex Railroad tracks..
  • Andover is the home of one of the only known surviving mile posts, and probably the best preserved. MP 55 sits slightly hidden from view under a pine tree north of the Maple Street crossing.
  • A relay circuit box stands at the ready at the crossing of Brighton Ave.
  • The station site is obliterated, but just past it is the concrete foundation of the Fulboam Creamery.
  • Approximately just across from the creamery foundation is a coal pocket, now roofed over and used for storage.
  • At Andover Junction there is a signal tower of the Lehigh and Hudson Railroad still standing.
  • At the Rt. 206 crossing the corpse of a relay circuit box leans away from the ROW. A few years ago, there was a telephone box on a pole at this location as well.

 

[Ackerson][Andover][Augusta][Between Waterloo Road and Cranberry Lake][Branchville][Branchville Junction][Cranberry Lake][Franklin][Lafayette][Monroe][Netcong][Newton][Stanhope][Strader's][Waterloo]


Updated 19 July 2000

Newton

  • At the Hicks Avenue crossing one of the best preserved relay circuit boxes is being hugged by an ever growing tree.

(Note: from Hicks Avenue to the missing trestle in the meadows, this property is not part of the Sussex Branch Trail. I do NOT encourage anyone to trespass on this property without permission of the owners (the Town of Newton.)

  • The Merriam Shoe Factory has been turned into housing.
  • The Iliff Lumber Co. sheds are still there and you can just imagine a siding running between the buildings.
  • The retaining wall along the abandoned portion of Railroad Avenue is still there.
  • The 1906 Freight house has been turned into a strip mall of sorts. I suppose this is better than taking it down. The 'L' portion was an add on. Up until the time of it's rejuvenation, there were still cobblestones paving the public access area of this station.
  • Over in the weeds there are signs of the old 90 foot turntable.
  • In the Meadows, there are several concrete posts scattered on the path and the careful eye will spot a few telegraph poles.
  • The Meadows trestle is out, but the breach is crossable in the dry season. Once in a while someone places a plank across the breach. There are also a pair of battery boxes hidden in the bushes. (photos: Dave Rutan 1999)

 

[Ackerson][Andover][Augusta][Between Waterloo Road and Cranberry Lake][Branchville][Branchville Junction][Cranberry Lake][Franklin][Lafayette][Monroe][Netcong][Newton][Stanhope][Strader's][Waterloo]


Updated: 1 June 2000

Branchville/Warbasse Junction

Station Site & Water tower:

  • The footings for the Water tower are still in place (inscription 1905)
  • Across from the tower are two wooden battery boxes. If you climb up the bank, there is a third box which has been pulled out of the ground. I'm not sure if this was vandalism or from a replacement.
  • The retaining wall along the station site is still here. [Concrete, about 130 feet long.]
  • A concrete structure shown on a DL&W map as an oil house still stands.
  • Halfway to the road is a hole with water in it surrounded by tie work. I think this was the spring mentioned in one of the articles I found. [Someone has recently filled this with large gravel, perhaps to avoid an attractive nuisance?]

 

The NYSW Diamond:

  • Two concrete signal footings.
  • Down the NYSW tracks towards Sparta there is a sign showing where the two lines crossed. Along the Franklin line, past the crossing there is a lone telegraph pole still standing.
  • Down further towards Sparta are the concrete bridge abutments.

 

[Ackerson][Andover][Augusta][Between Waterloo Road and Cranberry Lake][Branchville][Branchville Junction][Cranberry Lake][Franklin][Lafayette][Monroe][Netcong][Newton][Stanhope][Strader's][Waterloo]


Updated: 19 April 2002

Lafayette

  • Coming up the Meadows road from the center of town (along the Antique shops) the (RXR) sign still stands at the crossing.
  • There is a concrete post with a wooden box strapped to it along the driveway to the auto parts store. This was a junction box for connecting the signals to the power lines.
  • The skeleton of the old relay box at the crossing is being used as a bulletin board.
  • The concrete foundation along the ROW is from the Alderney Creamery--not the station. The station was up on short stilts like the one at Andover.

Remnants of sidings:

  • There is a siding that is inclined and ends in a concrete coal pocket at the edge of the auto parts parking lot.
  • The creamery siding is visible for a ways (some ties still visible.)
  • The ties are still in for the siding leading to the feed store doors.

Mudcut Road Crossing

  • At the Mudcut Road crossing there are the remains to two battery boxes.
  • In 1992 there was what I believe now to be a 'T' box or Telephone box. It's gone now, but the door was still there for me to measure.

 

[Ackerson][Andover][Augusta][Between Waterloo Road and Cranberry Lake][Branchville][Branchville Junction][Cranberry Lake][Franklin][Lafayette][Monroe][Netcong][Newton][Stanhope][Strader's][Waterloo]


Updated: 19 March 2000

Strader's

  • While this building has been converted for office space, the back side of it still retains a lot of it's former character. Standing on the bridge, one can still imagine a milk car or two being spotted at the loading dock to be loaded.
    • Here is a picture of the bridge and rock cut just east of Strader's Crossing.
    • And Here is a picture of my daughter and I at the bridge just west of Becker's Creamery.

     

[Ackerson][Andover][Augusta][Between Waterloo Road and Cranberry Lake][Branchville][Branchville Junction][Cranberry Lake][Franklin][Lafayette][Monroe][Netcong][Newton][Stanhope][Strader's][Waterloo]


Updated 19 March 2000

Augusta

  • Southeast of the crossing are the foundations of the Augusta creamery and the National Nutrient Company.
  • While the station site stands empty, just before the bridge is a concrete signal base with wires sticking out of it.

 

[Ackerson][Andover][Augusta][Between Waterloo Road and Cranberry Lake][Branchville][Branchville Junction][Cranberry Lake][Franklin][Lafayette][Monroe][Netcong][Newton][Stanhope][Strader's][Waterloo]


Updated 19 April 2002

Branchville

The ROW inside the Borough of Branchville is owned wholly by the borough. While it is unlikely anyone will object to your being there, I just wanted to let you know. Branchville is also seriously considering having the state put the two missing bridges in on the branch so that hikers can more easily get into town.
  • Just outside of town is the Rt. 206 overpass. This is one of Three spots on the entire Sussex Branch that a highway passes over the railroad. (the others were the bridge in Netcong between Netcong station and Port Morris, and Rt. 94 over the 'Franklin Line' near the Vo-Tech School.)
    • I call this the 'Double Whammy Overpass' It was built in 1940, so steam pulled trains under it for 13 years until they were taken off in favor of diesel power. The diesels ran under it for 13 years until the Branch was abandoned. 13 and 13--Double Whammy!
  • Before the Mill street crossing there is a 4 inch diameter pipe in a concrete block along the ROW. I can only figure this may have been the Yard Limit sign.
  • Just past the Mill Street crossing is a patch of level ground between the ROW and the Dry Brook. A section house once stood here.
  • The buildings are still standing for the coal store, Hoos & Fletcher Lumber, The original Borden's Creamery, the Agway (now Montague Tool & Supply) and the 1939 Sussex Milk & Cream Co. Building.
  • In front of the fire house is a plaque commemorating the entry of the Sussex Railroad into Branchville in 1869.

 

[Ackerson][Andover][Augusta][Between Waterloo Road and Cranberry Lake][Branchville][Branchville Junction][Cranberry Lake][Franklin][Lafayette][Monroe][Netcong][Newton][Stanhope][Strader's][Waterloo]



Updated 19 July 2000

Ackerson

  • I have never found so much as a flat spot at the location of the Ackerson station.

 

[Ackerson][Andover][Augusta][Between Waterloo Road and Cranberry Lake][Branchville][Branchville Junction][Cranberry Lake][Franklin][Lafayette][Monroe][Netcong][Newton][Stanhope][Strader's][Waterloo]

Updated 23 May 2001

Monroe

  • I believe the small house at this site was built on the foundation of the Fulboam creamery.
 

[Ackerson][Andover][Augusta][Between Waterloo Road and Cranberry Lake][Branchville][Branchville Junction][Cranberry Lake][Franklin][Lafayette][Monroe][Netcong][Newton][Stanhope][Strader's][Waterloo]


Updated 21 March 2001

Franklin

  • The two stone arches, originally built by the Sussex Railroad are still around. One can be seen from the active railroad line across from Scott Road and the other can be seen from Church Street by Edison Antiques.
  • The house at 8 Wildcat Road was once the switch tender's house for the Lackawanna. A few years ago (1997-98) the previous owner put a peak roof and siding on the structure as well as a second floor addition. I wish I had taken a picture of it before that happened.

 

[Ackerson][Andover][Augusta][Between Waterloo Road and Cranberry Lake][Branchville][Branchville Junction][Cranberry Lake][Franklin][Lafayette][Monroe][Netcong][Newton][Stanhope][Strader's][Waterloo]

'Bonerail' background and title graphic courtesy of my good friend, James Sorochinski
[Report a Broken Link]